Worm Art, grade 3/4

Today our worms had a visit from Ms. Tingley’s grade 3/4 class to learn about composting. Here’s a gallery of some of the art they produced, including a book by Ricky!

Introducing the Red Wigglers

Today we received a container of worms from Ook’s friends the Murray family and introduced them to our worm bin. They came with some nice compost of their own to get started with.

Worms in compost with cocoons.
Our worms arrived with some of their very own compost.

Here they are in their new bin, ready to start eating our apple cores and banana peels.

worms-spoon
Slightly out of focus! Here the worms are going into their bin.

Thanks to the Murrays for giving us the worms to get us started!

Motorcycles and Sweetgrass, by Drew Hayden Taylor

 

Reviewed by Kayla Nye

Motorcycles and Sweetgrass is a fictional story based on an Anishnawbe legend. When a stranger rolls into town on his motorcycle before the death of an elder, the little Anishnawbe community becomes less settled, as drama begins to unfold. The band council purchased a piece of land and the community goes wild. The chief is bombarded with suggestions on what to do with the newly purchased land; however she is less focused on that than the new stranger on his motorcycle. The chief’s son discovers a trait about the motorcyclist who has won his mother’s heart, and he tries his best to save his mother, with the help of his uncle. This story is guaranteed to give you a chuckle.

Postscript by Library Manager – This is a real laugh-out-loud story full of vivid characters with an important message about the necessity of a bit of spontaneity and even chaos in your life to shake you up and give you a new perspective on things. Highly recommended by both of us!

The Education of Augie Merasty: A Residential School Memoir

 

reviewed by Kayla Nye

The Education of Augie Merasty is a brief memoir of attending the St. Therese residential school in Sturgeon Landing, Saskatchewan from 1935-1944, which is written by David Carpenter;  however the story was told by Joseph Augie Merasty. It reveals the many hardships Native and Métis children experienced during that time.

In this memoir, Augie exposed his traumas to the audience; he tells about the Hitler-worshipping Brother, the Sister who would strike children for farting, and the many sexual assaults he witnessed or experienced. He also explains how his life had turned out after being released.

In 75 pages this book has taught me very much about cultural genocide and just how important it is to know how these people were treated.