Newsletter: June 2018

Books Worth Another Look
Guest Review by Hilda Partridge
The Widow, by Fiona Barton
Jane Taylor is the perfect wife standing by her man, Glen, who is suspected of a crime (a missing child, Bella). Suddenly she becomes a widow when Glen walks in front of an oncoming bus. Once he is dead there is no reason to keep quiet. She has secrets that now can be shared. This a real page turner, one I had to read in one sitting. I really enjoyed this first novel by Fiona Barton, and am looking forward to reading her next one, The Child.

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The library’s Garden Club will not be meeting over the summer (we hope you will be busy in your gardens!) but we will begin meeting again in September on the last Thursday of the month at 7 pm again. (First meeting, Thursday, September 27th.)

The kids’ and teens Guitar Club will not be meeting over the summer, but we’ll start up again in the fall on the first Saturday of the month at 2 pm. (1st meeting, Saturday, September 1st.)

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June 21st is Indigenous Peoples’ Day. We’ll have a special book display in the library for you to check out.

Avoid that summer reading slump by bringing your kids to the library this summer!

Pre-register for the Summer Reading Club at the library. We’ll have stories and crafts for ages 5-12. We’ll also offer a pre-school storytime if there is interest.

We’re busy planning some other exciting summer activities as well, for older children and teens. Contact the library for more details.

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The library’s annual Used Book Sale will be on at the library July 26-28 during our regular hours. The library board’s Silent Cake Auction will be held on Saturday, July 28th from 1-3 pm, during the Sandpiper Festival. Mark your calendars!

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Visions of Sugar Plums, by Janet Evanovich

The “Stephanie Plum” series of thriller/comedy/romances has been going strong for over twenty volumes since One for the Money first introduced bounty-hunter Stephanie and her romantic entanglements with police detective Joe Morelli and ex-special forces mystery man Ranger. Back in 2002 Evanovich began a side series of shorter novels or novellas about Stephanie, with themes tied to holidays. Unlike the books in the main series, which stick strictly to the real world, these holiday novels plunge into the lighter side of the supernatural and humans with minor superpowers. They also throw a third (sexy, of course) man into Stephanie’s life, Diesel, who has the irritating habit of showing up in Stephanie’s locked apartment to disrupt her already chaotic life with missions of his own. Visions of Sugar Plums is the first of these. Stephanie’s after a toy-maker named Sandy Claws who skipped out on his bail; Diesel claims he’s been sent to bring her the spirit of Christmas, which is sadly lacking in her life, but he’s taking quite an interest in Sandy Claws and wild Grandma Mazur’s electrifying new boyfriend too, and not to bring them the spirit of Christmas. (Diesel was then spun off into his own series about cupcakes and a quest for seven magic stones …)

Motorcycles and Sweetgrass, by Drew Hayden Taylor

 

Reviewed by Kayla Nye

Motorcycles and Sweetgrass is a fictional story based on an Anishnawbe legend. When a stranger rolls into town on his motorcycle before the death of an elder, the little Anishnawbe community becomes less settled, as drama begins to unfold. The band council purchased a piece of land and the community goes wild. The chief is bombarded with suggestions on what to do with the newly purchased land; however she is less focused on that than the new stranger on his motorcycle. The chief’s son discovers a trait about the motorcyclist who has won his mother’s heart, and he tries his best to save his mother, with the help of his uncle. This story is guaranteed to give you a chuckle.

Postscript by Library Manager – This is a real laugh-out-loud story full of vivid characters with an important message about the necessity of a bit of spontaneity and even chaos in your life to shake you up and give you a new perspective on things. Highly recommended by both of us!

The Education of Augie Merasty: A Residential School Memoir

 

reviewed by Kayla Nye

The Education of Augie Merasty is a brief memoir of attending the St. Therese residential school in Sturgeon Landing, Saskatchewan from 1935-1944, which is written by David Carpenter;  however the story was told by Joseph Augie Merasty. It reveals the many hardships Native and Métis children experienced during that time.

In this memoir, Augie exposed his traumas to the audience; he tells about the Hitler-worshipping Brother, the Sister who would strike children for farting, and the many sexual assaults he witnessed or experienced. He also explains how his life had turned out after being released.

In 75 pages this book has taught me very much about cultural genocide and just how important it is to know how these people were treated.

Europe in Autumn, by Dave Hutchinson

A spy thriller, a near-future science fiction adventure … a prophetic look at what follows the disintegration of the European Union under a rising tide of extreme nationalism and xenophobia …

Europe in Autumn is the first in a series about a fractured Europe in a world very like our own – a world after the devastation of a pandemic flu had led to a paranoid nationalism, with nations dividing and subdividing so rapidly that even citizens of a country can find it hard to keep track of just where they’re living. Recruited to a new career as spy and people-smuggler with a mysterious organization calling itself Les Coureurs des Bois, the protagonist, Rudi, a cook in eastern Europe when we first meet him, is drawn deeper and deeper into the mysteries underlying his world. Conspiracies within conspiracies, treachery, organized crime, a railway line that’s an independent state and a political power in Europe, the quest for a document that might reveal long-hidden secrets about the nature of the world, and Rudi’s increasingly desperate struggle to survive as he learns more than he should and employers and allies turn into enemies, make this a thriller hard to put down. If you enjoy Len Deighton and Alan Furst and other thrillers that combine action and suspense with intelligent stories and characters, as well as thoughtful science fiction, you should definitely pick up Europe in Autumn. We hope to have book two, Europe at Midnight, in the library soon.